Big data is a big topic these days, with companies aggregating consumer data and contracting with third-party marketers to mine it. However, an unforeseen problem arises around unclear data ownership. This is a problem because companies are packaging your data and selling it.

Take the following case — a client was looking to have a marketing company take its point-of-sale (POS) data to prepare email campaigns. Upon closer review of the contracts, data ownership was ambiguously defined and nested in three separate areas: the Master Services Agreement (MSA), SOW, and an addendum. When you trace the definition through the various documents, the only thing made clear on data ownership was that the campaigns resulting from the ETL (extract, transform, load) process were owned by the client. What about the POS data that was sent over to the marketing services company?

In a conversation with a data expert at a retail-focused marketing services company, they package your POS information and sell it to other buyers, thus creating an additional revenue stream. Disturbingly, clients are unaware this is happening and don't share in any of the profits.

Here's what to do to mitigate the issue:

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Big data is a big topic these days, with companies aggregating consumer data and contracting with third-party marketers to mine it. However, an unforeseen problem arises around unclear data ownership. This is a problem because companies are packaging your data and selling it.

Take the following case — a client was looking to have a marketing company take its point-of-sale (POS) data to prepare email campaigns. Upon closer review of the contracts, data ownership was ambiguously defined and nested in three separate areas: the Master Services Agreement (MSA), SOW, and an addendum. When you trace the definition through the various documents, the only thing made clear on data ownership was that the campaigns resulting from the ETL (extract, transform, load) process were owned by the client. What about the POS data that was sent over to the marketing services company?

In a conversation with a data expert at a retail-focused marketing services company, they package your POS information and sell it to other buyers, thus creating an additional revenue stream. Disturbingly, clients are unaware this is happening and don't share in any of the profits.

Here's what to do to mitigate the issue:

Read more

Cisco announced today a five-year strategic alliance with Citrix in the desktop virtualization space. As a first outcome of their new alliance, Cisco WAAS will be optimized for Citrix XenDesktop. It’s designed to improve the end-user experience such that it has “LAN-like” performance. This translates into the capability of a more rich Unified Communication experience–HD quality video, faster print jobs, and improved app performance. Rather than buying several products to get this done, this is nicely packaged as one solution for virtual and physical desktops.

What does this mean for Sourcing and Vendor Management (SVM) professionals and what can you do?

1. If your organization isn’t looking at this, it will be forced to within your next refresh cycle. While Desktop Virtualization has been around for years, it’s more recently been attracting enterprise customers at a very robust growth rate. Most resellers I’ve spoken to enjoy double digit semi-annual growth rates as high as 40% in inquiries and many of them include desktop virtualization on tablets. At this stage, most companies are still in education mode, but adoption appears to be steadily increasing. If you’re not working on it right now, spend the time to get educated on the various flavors and the elements of the project that lead to savings for your organization. ROI will vary from company to company due to the varying desktop environments.

2. Desktop Virtualization RFP’s I’ve seen commonly have no requirements–they initially look like solicitation for proposals with non-existent IT environmental descriptions. By including a user profile survey that entails apps and devices, networking environment, storage, security requirements, and any industry-specific requirements as it relates to anything in the cloud, SVM professionals can help cut down times in the sourcing process.

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A growing number of workers own personal smartphones that they might want to use for work. However, IT support costs and security implications for personal mobile devices connected to the corporate network are unclear.

As a result, sourcing and vendor management (SVM) professionals need tools to improve visibility into the real costs of their firm's mobile program. Moreover, this challenge will grow as most firms expand their bring-your-own mobile programs during the next three years.

SVMs also want tools that improve transparency and accountability around mobile work apps for things like enterprise software license compliance by personal device users. Smart SVMs at firms with many or a fast growing population of mobile information workers have already studied or are studying ways to mitigate mobile cost and security risks associated with allowing employees to use personal devices like smartphones and tablets for work.

See my report, “Personal Device Momentum Will Challenge Traditional Mobile Sourcing Strategies” for a more detailed discussion about what companies are doing to address these challenges, and empower employees in new ways by offering more options on how – and where – they do their jobs.

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